In response to the post, “Yes, I Know the Hours are Long – Part 1 & 2 (11/7/2010),” a principal writes: Ahhhhhhh! These comments sound like they came from my campus! When will the excuse making and complaining stop? If we, as educators, are so blinded by the need to preserve our own comfort by resisting changes that could potentially make the difference between student failure and success, ITS TIME TO RETIRE!!!!!! Get on board or get out of the way. Precious energy is being wasted on you that could and should be focused on kids! SC Response The excuse making stops when we embrace the three concepts of short-term data analysis and adjustment, transparency, and collaboration. Without the integrated use of all three, the self-esteem and self-preservation needs of the individual (adults) will trump the needs of the many (students). This is not an indictment; it is human nature. And before you accuse me of being cynical, insulting teachers, or both, refer to the works of Adams, Hamilton, Madison and Jay. The recognition of the above underscores the importance of leadership. It is leadership that installs the structure and systems that support data collection and use, transparency, and collaboration. It is leadership that ensures the implementation of these practices. And it is leadership that must communicate the importance and benefits of these practices, like a broken record. Absent of this leadership, nothing will actually change. In the short run, you are correct, a lot of energy is wasted getting people to move in a forward direction. This is the case in nearly all organizations. It is the “fly-wheel” effect that Collins describes; the initial one-step forward, two-steps back process that precedes the eventual leap forward. Do know that as the machine begins to lurch forward and more staff and students are successful, the nay-bobs will either change their ways or go away. Which is a win for everyone involved. Think. Work. Achieve.Your turn…

Menu