In response to the post, “Mythology” a reader writes: I enjoyed this article. Student engagement and purposeful talk are an informal way of assessing “who gets it and who doesn’t” in a jiffy. Most students lack descriptive words in their speech and can no more write than speak appropriately. They use the same words over and over again. This is my second year to use purposeful talk and the more I use it the more I learn about our society: There is no one for many of our students to talk to at home, therefore, our students have TV language and their cognitive language is lacking. It is so difficult for them to speak about a science experiment we just completed. Consequently, I end up doing the same experiment until they have the vocabulary to speak about it. The most interesting conclusion – now the student can talk about it at home. I wanted to share and agree with your article. SC Response Thank you for sharing and thank you for validating the power of this Fundamental 5 practice. You are correct in pointing out that in many households, for any number of reasons, our students get little opportunity to converse. Much less, converse about academic topics. The more we model this behavior and provide students frequent opportunities to practice, the more our students blossom and begin to enjoy learning. Plus, as the teacher you get the added benefit of being able to sneak in a little rigor and relevance on the fly. Think. Work. Achieve. Your turn…

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