A Reader Asks… The Instructional Rigor/Relevance Shift Map

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A LYS Teacher who is using The Fundamental 5 Lesson Plan App (Fun 5 Plans) asks the following:

SC,

Good afternoon. Could you explain to me the instructional shift graph? What do the letters “O, C, W, and T” mean? And do the colors of the arrows mean anything?

Thanks.

SC Response Great questions. The Instructional Shift graph that is generated in the Fun 5 Plans app illustrates the shifts in instructional rigor and relevance that will occur if you deliver the lesson as planed.  Consider the example below.

  

First, the vertical axis represents Instructional Rigor.  The horizontal axis represents Instructional Relevance.

Next, here is what the letters O, T, W and C represent.

O = my opening objective.  This is the starting point of instructional rigor and relevance.

T = The Instructional Rigor and Relevance of my student purposeful talk sessions.  The arrow illustrates the magnitude of the shift.

W = The Instructional Rigor and Relevance of my embedded critical writing activity. The arrow illustrates the magnitude of the shift.

C = The Instructional Rigor and Relevance of my closing question. The arrow illustrates the magnitude of the shift.

Finally, the colors of the arrows do have meaning.  The arrows, which all begin at the lesson objective, terminate in the rigor/relevance quadrant of the planned activity. The termination quadrant determines the arrow color. Red arrows represent low-level (as defined by category of rigor and relevance) instructional activities. Yellow arrows represent mid-level instructional activities. Green arrows represent high-level instructional activities. 

The colors are NOT quality standards; they are planning tools that assist a teacher in determining if the rigor and relevance of an activity meets her instructional intent.

If I deliver the my lesson (represented in the graph above) as planned, even though my direct teach is at the knowledge / comprehension level, the Frequent Small Group Purposeful Talk, Critical Writing and Closing Question will create multiple spikes in rigor and relevance throughout the lesson.  This will facilitate retention, critical thinking, creativity and complex problem solving.  All good things and all in a single 45 to 90 minute class period.

I hope this helps.  Stay in touch.

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