In response to the 3/3/2009 post “Teacher Nests,” a reader writes: I understand that there are probably teachers who take advantage of their “nesting” areas, but punishing the entire field of teachers isn’t the answer. Yes, I love my coffee (as do many). And yes, I use a refrigerator. However, my students are allowed access to the refrigerator for their water bottles. To say that a person, who spends ten hours a day at their job, can’t have a coffee pot and refrigerator for lunch, water, and dinner (sometimes dinner) isn’t okay. Think about the teachers who spend hours BEFORE and AFTER school at work. SC Response First of all, thanks for browsing through the archives. I appreciate your interest in the prior conversations that we have engaged in on this blog. And I encourage any new readers to do so, also. My issue with teacher nests has nothing to do with punishing teachers and everything to do with making teachers and classrooms more effective and efficient. Which reduces teacher stress and creates more time for teachers to spend at home. Or, thanks to our governor and legislators, will give teachers a fighting chance to teach and manage 40+ students in a class. I could (and do) address this issue for hours, but for this post I will just summarize the highlights. 1. It is beyond refute that the environment in which you place the learner can either accelerate or decelerate the pace of learning. Meaning that as a teacher, the classroom environment can either help me or hurt me. My goal is to help the teacher. 2. It is beyond refute that the environment in which you place yourself can help or hinder your ability to complete a task and has an impact on the quality of the completed task. Which means as a teacher, the classroom environment can either help me or hurt me. My goal is to help the teacher. 3. It is beyond refute that a teacher “nest” is positively correlated to an increased classroom clutter and disorganization. 4. It is beyond refute that a teacher “nest” is negatively correlated to time spent in the “Power Zone.” 5. It is beyond refute that time spent in the “Power Zone” is positively correlated to increased “on-task” behavior and decreased discipline issue. 6. It is beyond refute that the teacher is completely in charge of his or her “nest.” As we all know, my job is to help schools improve performance and to make educators more effective. I understand that some changes are easier than others and that some changes feel like personal attacks. But do know, for me its not personal. I just want you and your students to exceed your expectations. Think. Work. Achieve. Your turn… Call Jo at (832) 477-LEAD to order your campus set of “The Fundamental 5: The Formula for Quality Instruction.” Individual copies available on Amazon.com! http://tinyurl.com/4ydqd4t Follow Sean Cain and LYS on www.Twitter.com/LYSNation

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