The same reader/writer submitted the following two comments. Mr. Cain, I commented on this blog (Yes, I Know the Hours are Long) yesterday, yet I see you refuse to post my comments. Are you afraid that the readers of this blog might actually agree with me about the extreme hours, over the top demands by administration, and piling on of concept after concept, all at the expense of actually being able to teach? I see that 3 people disagree with your blog while only 2 agree. Can you not post comments from someone who doesn’t agree with you? SC Response First of all, I appreciate the fact that you are reading the blog. However, by the tone of your comment, I have to assume that you are fairly new to the LYS forum. Based on that assumption, I’ll explain how I deal with reader submissions. In general, I post comments on a first come, first served basis. So it takes about two to three weeks for a comment to post. Which is why the topics seem to be presented in waves. Occasionally, some comments will be moved up in the order, because of interest, timeliness, or as in your case, there is a contrary view. Second, as for a suggested “fear of disagreement,” there is none. Third, as long time readers and true LYS’ers know, this is the arena of ideas. May the best idea win. Fourth, debate is healthy and hones the intellect by fostering critical thought. This blog began as a vehicle for a handful of progressive school leaders (the old school LYS’ers) to discuss, vent and debate on topics relating to operating an effective school or school district. Fifth, I sign my initials at the start of every one of my comments. If I write it, I stand behind it until new information or experiences revise my thinking. I do not hide behind an anonymous posting. I do not believe that is what a true leader or a person of conviction would do. Now for your original comment, which has been moved up in the rotation (along with all the submitted comments relating to post in question). Think. Work. Achieve. In response to the post “Yes, I Know the Hours are Long,” a teacher writes: Mr. Cain – your numbers are way, way off. We put in about twice the hours you have noted in your chart. Yes, I agree that this is a job I love, but we have had so many changes piled on us this year (your program being one of them), that the stress level of our school is off the charts. I would LOVE to have the time to completely devote to teaching and preparing for my students, but all of our time this year (almost every planning hour, after school hours, etc.) is being swallowed by strategies, theories, concepts and meetings (during the day which requires a sub) that we have absolutely NO time left to breathe. My mental and physical health are very important when facing 155 students every day, and that is being compromised this year by theories, theories, theories. Don’t try to make us feel bad because we have families and outside lives when we are devoting many more hours to our jobs than you give us credit for. Dare I say, yes, my family does come first in my life, but that doesn’t mean I don’t love teaching also. SC Response First, in my post I illustrate that to do the job well requires a minimum of 60 hours a week. I did not imply that teachers work only 60 hours a week. However, a claim of 120 hours per week is hard to support. I do empathize with your struggle to implement new practices. Any change can be difficult and stressful. Though I cannot address the specifics of your campus, I can address the specifics of the training and support provided by Lead Your School. At the classroom level we emphasize the execution of a common scope and sequence (a foundation practice), the use of short-term common assessments (a foundation practice) and the reflective implementation of five fundamental instructional practices. Yes, it can be stressful when first working on this, but to not do so is to decide to be purposefully ineffective. From your statements, I do not believe that you fall in this category. Though you may be in the “fake it until you make it” mode, I doubt that your students are being harmed by education theory. What harms students is the failure to attempt to apply theory and best practice in the classroom. In no way was I attempting to make effective teachers feel bad. I was validating that exceptional teachers work exceptional hours. I was validating that teacher hours are long in every setting. And I was attempting to point out that if one entered the profession because they thought that the hours would be easy, then they chose the wrong profession. Think. Work. Achieve.Your turn…

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